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Are roof tiles covered by building insurance?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:42:29 Europe/London

ARE ROOF TILES COVERED BY BUILDING INSURANCE?

Usually roof tiles and slates are covered by Buildings Insurance, although this may vary between providers and should be checked.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

How to remove moss from a roof

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:41:54 Europe/London

HOW TO REMOVE MOSS FROM A ROOF

We stock & supply Cromar Moss & Mould Remover which kills lichen, moss and similar vegetation resulting in growth free roof tiles and slates.

Products such as this can also be used to remove growth on roofs, walls and other external surfaces prior to treatment with surface finishes.

Application is easy: Simply apply by brush or low pressure spray at a rate of 4 - 6m2 per litre per coat, and leave for approximately one hour.

The surface is then cleaned using a stiff bristled brush to remove any loose debris and a second coat can be applied if any growth remains.

The cleaned surfaces should then be left for at least 24 hours to cure, before cleaning again and washing down again, taking care to remove any white deposits which may have formed.

The use of a high pressure jet wash at any stage in this process is strongly discouraged as this has a very high liklihood of permanent damage and degradation of the roof tiles or slates.

It is strongly recommended that a trial area should be coated initially to assess the correct dosage, and that products such as these should not be applied in wet weather to prevent run off and local contamination.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Which roof tiles are suitable for a high pitch roof?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:40:58 Europe/London

WHICH ROOF TILES ARE SUITABLE FOR A HIGH PITCH ROOF?

Broadly you can use any roof tile up to a pitch of 75 degrees, with concrete and clay plain tiles able to be used for vertical applications at 90 degrees.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Which roof tiles are suitable for a low pitch roof?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:40:02 Europe/London

WHICH ROOF TILES ARE SUITABLE FOR A LOW PITCH ROOF?

Low pitch roofs are generally considered to be those below 22.5 degrees, and above 10 degrees.

There are a number of roof tiles available that are suitable for installation on low pitch roofs.

Concrete interlocking roof tiles such as Sandtoft Double Romans and Sandtoft Calderdales are the most popular concrete options, with the Imerys HP10Imerys HP20 and Sandtoft 20/20s being the most popular clay options.

Alternatively, another solution to the challenge of which roof tiles to use at low pitches is to use Klober Permo Extreme breathable membrane instead of standard breathable membrane.

Klober Permo Extreme breathable membrane enables the use of roof tiles down to pitches as low as 12.5 degrees (depending on the roof tiles being laid). This is a very popular option, indeed the only viable solution, where an exact match to the existing roof tiles on the main roof is essential, such as clay handmade tiles where the minimum roof pitch that the tiles can be installed at, being 35 degrees typically, precludes their use normally at such low pitches.

It is worth noting that the rafter length of a low pitch roof can have a bearing on whether particular tiles, even if they are suitable for that particular pitch, can be used.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Which roof tiles last the longest?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:39:15 Europe/London

WHICH ROOF TILES LAST THE LONGEST?

In practical terms, clay roof tiles and natural slates last the longest, with usable examples over 100+ years being relatively common - on occasion customers bring in clay roof tiles or slates to be matched that are much older.

We have seen clay roof tiles that are estimated to be at least 250 years old that still had plenty of life left in them.

Concrete tiles degrade over time in both appearance and integrity, and they will certainly be approaching their 'twilight years' after 60 years - having said that we are regularly asked to match concrete roof tiles laid just after the end of WW2 - over 70 years ago - that are still in fair condition.

Enviromental factors such as pollution or severe weather (such as in coastal locations) can have a marked effect on roof tiles: when we see old roof tiles from within the M25 boundary surrounding London, it is readily apparent how much worse their condition is than those that we see of a similar age from the Home Counties.

Roof tiles and slates are not designed to be walked on - doing so, when installing solar panels for example, leads to many breakages and leaks.

Pressure washing of roof tiles and slates is arguably the worst thing that can be done to a roof, and it is strongly advised against. If moss is a problem or unsightly then we recommend the application of a proper Moss & Mould Remover (such as the Cromar Moss & Mould Remover that we supply), and that the instructions are dilligently followed.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Can you paint roof tiles?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:38:41 Europe/London

CAN YOU PAINT ROOF TILES?

We supply specially formulated paint for application to fibre cement 'man made' slates and concrete roof tiles only.

Painting natural slates or clay tiles is not recommended using any products.

The use of non specialist roof tile paints is strongly advised against.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Are roof tiles waterproof?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:38:08 Europe/London

ARE ROOF TILES WATERPROOF?

Yes roof tiles are waterproof.

Being porous they absorb small quantities of water, however the actual tiles will not let water through, and if laid correctly and not broken, no water will get past them into the property below.

The breathable or non breathable membrane laid underneath the tiles also acts as a secondary barrier, albeit only a temporary one.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Are roof tiles porous?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:37:36 Europe/London

ARE ROOF TILES POROUS?

Yes roof tiles are porous - they absorb small amounts of water, which then evaporates harmlessly.

Does that mean that roof tiles leak? No. As long as they are not broken and are laid correctly, at the correct roof pitch, they will not leak.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

How long will roof tiles last?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:37:01 Europe/London

HOW LONG WILL ROOF TILES LAST?

This is in fact two questions: Firstly, 'How long are roof tiles & slates guaranteed for?', and secondly, 'What is the life expectancy of roof tiles & slates'?

Clay roof tiles are, for example, manufactured to BRE standards with a minimum life expectancy of 60 years in normal conditions.

It should be noted however that 'life expectancy' should not be taken as a guarantee or warranty.

Broadly, roof tiles and slates will remain serviceable for many decades - we can supply natural slates with a manufacturer's guarantee of 100 years.

There are a number of factors that affect the length of each manufacturer's guarantee for each roof and the tiles or slates installed: To obtain a full manufacturer's warranty - which varies by manufacturer and product used - the roof will need to be designed by the manufacturer, installed to all the current standards using a complete suite of products and fixings from the manufacturer's own range.

In practical terms, the life expectancy of clay roof tiles will be 60+ years - on occasion customers bring in clay roof tiles or slates to be matched that are much older. We have seen clay roof tiles that are estimated to be at least 250 years old that still had plenty of life left in them.

Concrete tiles degrade over time in both appearance and integrity, and they will certainly be approaching their 'twilight years' after 60 years - having said that we are regularly asked to match concrete roof tiles laid just after the end of WW2 - over 70 years ago - that are still in fair condition.

The life expectancy of natural slates varies according to the type of slate used and the quality, which will as you would expect be reflected in the price, with life expectancies between 30 and 100 years, whilst man made slates have a life expectancy of up to 60 years.

Enviromental factors such as pollution or severe weather (such as in coastal locations) can have a marked effect on roof tiles: when we see old roof tiles from within the M25 boundary surrounding London, it is readily apparent how much worse their condition is than those that we see of a similar age from the Home Counties.

Roof tiles and slates are not designed to be walked on - doing so, when installing solar panels for example, leads to many breakages and leaks.

Pressure washing of roof tiles and slates is arguably the worst thing that can be done to a roof, and it is strongly advised against. If moss is a problem or unsightly, then we recommend the application of a proper Moss & Mould Remover (such as the Cromar Moss & Mould Remover that we supply), and that the instructions are dilligently followed.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller

Roof Shingles vs Roof Tiles: Which is better?

Wednesday, 10 January 2018 10:36:27 Europe/London

ROOF SHINGLES VS ROOF TILES: WHICH IS BETTER?

Roof shingles or roof tiles: which is the best roof covering for your property?

The answer to this varies according to where you live: In the Unites States Of America, over 70% of domestic dwellings have felt roof shingles as their primary roof covering, yet we have not heard of a single instance in the UK!

To comply with UK Building Regulations, you could, in theory, use felt shingles, however it is unlikely that a Local Planning Officer would accept these as being 'in keeping' with the local area.

Traditionally in the UK we have used clay or concrete roof tiles, as well as natural or man made slates to cover our houses. To preserve the perceived value of your house in the eyes of potential buyers it would be unwise to use anything else - not to mention the implications for obtaining insurance cover and a mortgage.

Posted in FAQ's By Nick Stuart-Miller
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